A bit about Scouting

For those of you who have spent the best part of the last 10 years travelling the globe, meeting people from all over the world, having the craic on camp and spending your weekend doing things that no one would ever believe on the Monday, you can gloss over this bit – You already know exactly what Scouting is about.

For those of you new to all of this, a bit of an introduction might help.

Scouting’s been around for over 100 years and enjoys a membership of over 28 million around the world, but what’s the reason for this success?

Maybe it’s because Scouting gives young people a space where they can pretty much do whatever they want, with whoever they want.

Maybe it’s because Scouting helps young people to gain skills and confidence that they probably wouldn’t get anywhere else. Scouting’s aim is to help young people see the world, meet new people and develop skills that they can use to help themselves and others.

Scouting allows young people to see the world, meet new people and develop skills that they can use to help themselves and others. We operate with a simple system called the Scout Method.

Being a bit of a hippy and all, Baden Powell didn’t like telling people that they couldn’t do things. So instead he came up with the idea of giving people a guide for living, rather than a set of rules that can’t be broken.

He included stuff that helps Rover scouts run a bit smoother, like trust and respect. So when you join Rover scouts you make a commitment to try to follow this guide as best you can. You make this commitment to yourself with your group when you feel ready. It can be as formal or informal as you like, at the top of a mountain, on a raft or somewhere that has a special relevance to you and the crew.